3 Trades

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Trades

Trades include any hands on learned skill:

bulletWoodwork
bulletMetalwork
bulletTechnical drawing
bulletCooking
bulletFashion design
bulletAutomotive
bulletMarine engineering
bulletComputer programming
bulletBuilding
bulletOther ... depending upon the local environment.

In combination, it might be advised to learn physics/graphics for the hard materials. Likewise, other subjects could be combined.

Example

Automotive would be hands on first. Do everything first and study in depth later. Studying different types of file or screwdriver after having used them is far more natural than reading about them in a book and drawing pictures of them before being used. Indeed, there is no need to draw different types of screwdriver in your exercise book. I know what they are, and I have never needed to draw one. Likewise spanners and sockets. Use first; learn theory later.

It might be wise to briefly study an engine before pulling one apart, but leave the detailed study for later, after a few have been pulled apart and rebuilt. Switch the logic and keep it interesting and practical. The aim ought not to be study one engine in detail but to study many different engines, picking up detail naturally as you progress.

An interesting mid-year project for a small group might be: carefully pull a motorcycle or car apart in a day, every nut and bolt; rebuild it in two; see if everything still works as it should.

Each year, the cohort should do different projects, not just rebuilding the same old engine or car or bike each year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Last updated: 02/25/18.